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The ROI of handwriting a thank-you note

Liz-Hochstedler-Blog

By Liz Keener
December 24, 2013
Filed under Blogs, Liz Keener

When I was in the midst of wedding planning about a year ago, everything was as crazy as every bride always describes it, but the digital era delivered even more chaos. I was constantly bombarded with emails from DJs, photographers, reception halls, you name it, trying to get my business.

But what stuck with me the most was a handwritten letter I received from the bridal shop where my bridesmaids had purchased their dresses from. Our consultant, Michelle, not only took the time to write and mail a letter, but she also personalized it. She thanked me for bringing my bridesmaids in and went into detail about our specific appointment. I don’t know if she wrote the note directly after my appointment, took notes in a CRM or somewhere else, or just has a great memory, but that personalization really struck a chord with me.

It’s important to make your customers feel appreciated, and they’re not just dropping $600 at your dealership, they’re spending much more than that. A thank-you letter goes further than an email because it takes longer to write and an effort to send.

I recently read a blog: You emailed? Try a letter next time, and it reminded me of that great experience with my bridal consultant. Not only did I appreciate the letter, but I returned the favor with my loyalty, assuring I chose that same shop for my tuxedo rentals. There’s no doubt in my mind that most customers would do the same.

So next time you’re about to rattle off a quick email to a recent buyer, think twice and consider sending a letter instead.

Comments

2 Responses to “The ROI of handwriting a thank-you note”

  1. Evie Kabe on December 26th, 2013 12:13 pm

    I agree with you. The headline, however, uses an abbreviation with which I’m not familiar: ROI. The digital age has brought many wonderful things, but some of the shortcuts may not be one of them. What does ROI mean? Is it an industry term? A text message abbreviation? A digital shortcut?

    Maybe the headline should also contain information with which everyone is familiar.

    [Reply]

    jonathan.sweet Reply:

    Thanks for reading, Evie. ROI means “return on investment.”

    [Reply]

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