Court denies challenge to E15

Jonathan Sweet
January 17, 2013
Filed under News

The U.S Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia has denied a rehearing on the decision that allows the EPA to put E15 on the market.

The marine industry has been particularly vocal about the issue, with groups including NMMA and MRAA joining efforts to keep E15 – a fuel blend containing 15 percent ethanol – off the market because of fears it will damage marine engines if boat owners unwittingly use it to fuel their vessels.

“We are disappointed in the D.C. Circuit decision,” Cindy Squires, NMMA’s chief counsel for public affairs and director of regulatory affairs said in an email to Boating Industry. “We remind consumers that E15 is not approved for marine engines and not to fuel your boat with 15 percent ethanol gasoline. As we consider our next steps we will continue to educate consumers about the dangers of E15 and encourage anyone interested in learning more to visit www.smarterfuelfuture.org.”

NMMA has distributed warning labels to its member boat manufacturers, warning of the danger of engine damage from E15.

AAA has also urged the EPA to reevaluate its approval of E15, citing a lack of knowledge about the fuel among consumers, with 95 percent of drivers unfamiliar with it.

Click here to read more.

Comments

5 Responses to “Court denies challenge to E15”

  1. Don Sawyer on January 18th, 2013 11:16 am

    Unfortunately, these Gas Bags in D.C. can’t understand what the guy sitting next to them is saying, so it should be no suprise that they can’t understand the real world concerns about the effects of their actions.

    [Reply]

  2. William Lehr on January 18th, 2013 11:22 am

    I’ve addressed this issue before when the farm lobby successfully introduced ethanol as a fuel additive.
    The whole concept that ethanol (grain alcohol) should be in your gas tank rather than in your glass over ice is absolutely ridiculous.
    First of all, ethanol has a much lower BTU (energy) content than fossil fuels and to make up for the reduced energy (mileage) level, you’ll have to burn more gas to compensate for its presence.
    Second, ethanol is made from corn. The amount of energy used to produce ethanol by tilling the land,planting,fertilizing, harvesting,fermenting and distillation of the resulting mash brings into question its net energy contribution.
    Thirdly, comming from corn, a vital food needed in a world of hunger, what the hell are these lawyers and politicians thinking?
    If you doubt the energy disparity between ethanol and gasoline, just put a quantity of each in each hand, have someone ignite same with a match, and see which one you extinguish first.
    Furthermore, if you need more convincing, ethanol, being water soluble, acts as a coupling agent, increasing the solubility of water in fuel, not a very good idea.
    I guess the purpose of this diatribe, is to point out that we have the most illinformed politicians in congress and lawyers on the bench imaginable!

    [Reply]

  3. carl bullock on January 25th, 2013 8:04 pm

    all motorcycles, small gas powered hand tools, quads, and other engines will be ruined by this farce (just to keep the money from the big farm industry into the pockets of our pseudo leaders!) This is just another reason why we need to vote every congressman out of office. They have no idea who we are. They are professional leaches who think our taxes are fun money for them to enjoy. When are we going to wake up? The most recent election tells us that the majority of our voters are thrilled with the rampant corruption in Washington!

    [Reply]

  4. Adam Almeida on February 2nd, 2013 11:38 am

    Not a good decision but we need to do our best to protect our customers. Can an engine burning more ethanol last with less timing, more ignition events. I’m not a chemist but is their anything that can be used as a catalyst to help ethanol burn more efficiently. The hydrophilic component scares me the most, seems the only real solution is to use the fuel quickly?

    In our antique cars we have been using the old style leather diaphragms again as they hold up better to this junky fuel.

    [Reply]

  5. jeff sleight on February 4th, 2013 2:50 pm

    what the hell does it take to get the american consumer riled enough to say we will not take this anymore. you have an industry saying that this product will absolutely destroy their products and they won’t be liable for it and the blowhards with energy portfolios and corn farming brother in laws jammining this shit down our throats. who is the attorney with big enough balls to organize us in a class action suit before the e15 wrecks more of our hard earned possessions. there are absolute alternatives to this madness.

    [Reply]

Feel free to leave a comment...
and oh, if you want a pic to show with your comment, go get a gravatar!